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Jan 14 2019

In Pictures: The 2019 Rally for Public Lands

See some of the best photos from last week's Rally for Public Lands

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The crowd of 2,000 packed all three levels of the Capitol Rotunda (photo by Eliza Wiley) 
The crowd packed all three levels of the Capitol Rotunda (photo by Eliza Wiley)

Capitol facilities management estimated that there were 2,000 people jammed like sardines into the Rotunda (photo by Eliza Wiley)
Capitol facilities management estimated that there were 2,000 people jammed like sardines into the Rotunda (photo by Eliza Wiley) 

Even the stairs behind the podium were jam-packed with public lands supporters from across the state (photo by Eliza Wiley)
Even the stairs behind the podium were jam-packed with public lands supporters from across the state (photo by Eliza Wiley)

Attendees brought signs proclaiming their love for our public lands and encouraging decision makers to act now to protect them (photo by Eliza Wiley)
Attendees brought signs proclaiming their love for our public lands and encouraging decision makers to act now to protect them (photo by Eliza Wiley)

The Rally kicked off with a raucous welcome for a surprise guest from Big Sandy (photo by Eliza Wiley)
The Rally kicked off with a raucous welcome for a surprise guest from Big Sandy (photo by Eliza Wiley)

Senator Tester advocated for the reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and led the crowd in a chant of
Senator Tester advocated for the reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, and led the crowd in a chant of "L-W-C-F" (photo by Anson Nygaard)

Senator Tester was followed by Ryan Busse, vice president of sales at Kimber Manufacturing. Standing next to his son Badge, named for the Badger-Two Medicine, Busse spoke passionately about the need to defend Habitat Montana and protect public lands across the state (photo by Anson Nygaard)
Senator Tester was followed by Ryan Busse, vice president of sales at Kimber Manufacturing. Standing next to his son Badge, named for the Badger-Two Medicine, Busse spoke passionately about the need to defend Habitat Montana and protect public lands across the state (photo by Anson Nygaard)

The third speaker was Maggie Carr, co-owner of Choteau-based Dropstone Outfitting. Carr spoke about the role public lands play in our $7 billion outdoor economy, and how vital they are to small business like hers that depend directly on our public lands (photo by Anson Nygaard)
The third speaker was Maggie Carr, co-owner of Choteau-based Dropstone Outfitting. Carr spoke about the role public lands play in our $7 billion outdoor economy, and how vital they are to small business like hers that depend directly on our public lands (photo by Anson Nygaard) 

Following Carr, Shane Doyle opened with a Northern Cheyenne song that he dedicated to the crowd, whom he called  ”true, high-minded, big-hearted human beings who aren't afraid to say what's right.
Following Carr, Shane Doyle opened with a Northern Cheyenne song that he dedicated to the crowd, whom he called ”true, high-minded, big-hearted human beings who aren't afraid to say what's right." (photo by Anson Nygaard)

Doyle also joked that the steamy Rotunda was
Doyle also joked that the steamy Rotunda was "one of the biggest sweatlodges I've ever been in." (photo by Anson Nygaard)

Governor Steve Bullock finished the rally with a thunderous speech that called on the legislature and on Congress to properly fund the infrastructure of public lands. “We cannot and must not leave to our kids and grandkids anything less than the unrivaled outdoor experience and heritage that our parents and grandparents worked so hard to preserve for us.”  Bullock also addressed legislation that Senator Steve Daines and Congressman Greg Gianforte introduced eliminating 29 wilderness study area, legislation he said “cut the public out of decisions over our wilderness study areas.”(photo by Anson Nygaard)

Governor Steve Bullock finished the rally with another thunderous speech that called on the legislature and on Congress to properly fund the infrastructure of public lands. “We cannot and must not leave to our kids and grandkids anything less than the unrivaled outdoor experience and heritage that our parents and grandparents worked so hard to preserve for us.” Bullock also addressed legislation that Senator Steve Daines and Congressman Greg Gianforte introduced eliminating 29 wilderness study area, legislation he said “cut the public out of decisions over our wilderness study areas.” (photo by Anson Nygaard)

He then addressed the public lands record of the current presidential administration. “Let’s not forget we have a president who has consistently attacked our public lands, most notably in Utah, where he led the largest elimination of public lands in U.S. history,” he said. “An attack on public lands anywhere is an attack on public lands everywhere,” he said. “It flies in the face of who area as Montanans and who are as Americans.”
He then addressed the public lands record of the current presidential administration. “Let’s not forget we have a president who has consistently attacked our public lands, most notably in Utah, where he led the largest elimination of public lands in U.S. history,” he said. “An attack on public lands anywhere is an attack on public lands everywhere,” he said. “It flies in the face of who area as Montanans and who are as Americans.” (photo by Anson Nygaard)